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World’s Biggest Warehouses and Factories

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This week we will take a look at something a little different, the world’s biggest warehouses and factories. The expanse of some of these warehouses is mind blowing and allows us to consider the work that is put in to not only building them, but the products that they produce.

Boeing Everett Factory

This factory is, by volume, the largest building in the world at a staggering 472,370,319 cubic feet, or 98.3 acres. Located in Washington, USA, it is an aeroplane assembly building owned by Boeing. The warehouse has been in commission since 1966 after Pan American Airlines signed a contract worth $525 million with Boeing to build 25 747s.

The Everett Factory has also been home to Boeing 767s, 777s and the newest in the fleet, the 787 Dreamliner. In addition to the construction of Boeing aeroplanes, the factory has several cafes, a theatre and a museum.

boeing everett

Aerium

The Aerium was initially designed to build enormous airships as a pioneering move for business logistics. Although the company behind this elaborate plan went bankrupt in 2002. The biggest freestanding hall in the world, located in Brandenburg, Germany, is now known as Tropical Islands Resort after the Malaysian Corporation, Tanjong, who spent a reported €78 million, bought the complex.

The landmark covers a vast 184 million cubic feet and has several different themed areas. It is home to the world’s biggest indoor rainforest and has a 27-metre high water slide tower amongst many more attractions. The park opened in 2004, attracting close to a million visitors during its first full year, and employs approximately 500 people.

aerium

Meyer Werft

Founded in 1795, this privately held and family-owned business started out by building small wooden vessels. It now constructs some of the world’s biggest luxury passenger ships. Meyer Werft GmbH is one of the major shipyards in the world and approximately 700 ships have been built at the yard since its inception.

It gained international recognition through the construction of roll on/roll off ferries, passenger ferries, container ships, livestock ferries and luxury cruise ships. Located in Papenburg, Germany, Meyer Werft occupies 167 million cubic feet, retains some 2500 employees and has the largest roofed dry docks in the world.

meyer weft

Constellation Bristol

‘Europe’s biggest booze warehouse’ covers 858,000 square feet with an internal volume the equivalent to 14,000 double decker buses! Situated in Bristol, England the complex can hold 57 million bottles of wine, which, if laid end-to-end, would stretch over 9,000 miles – the distance from London to Perth, Australia.

The warehouse accounts for 15 per cent of the UK’s total wine and alcohol market with a staggering 800 bottles of wine bottled each minute.

constellation bristol

NASA Vehicle Assembly Building

The Vehicle Assembly Building or VAB at NASA’s Kennedy Space Centre was used from 1968-2011 to assemble American manned launch vehicles and is situated on the coast of Florida, USA.

The VAB, which covers 348,000 square feet in over 8 acres of land, was completed in 1966. It was originally built to allow for the vertical assembly of the Saturn V rocket but eventually was used for the shuttle’s external fuel tanks and flight hardware. The VAB is currently the largest single-story building in the world.

nasa

Target Import Warehouse

Unbelievably, this import warehouse has the fourth-largest footprint in the world covering a staggering 159,000 m². As well as the Boeing Everett Factory, this mega-warehouse is located in Washington State, USA and is one of four Target import warehouses across the nation, although the Washington branch is certainly the focal point of the four.

The warehouse was built to distribute imported products to internal Target warehouses.

target

 

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